GRADING POLICIES
  Spring 2001
R. B. Taylor
CJ 161

Paper Policies
Makeup
Late Policy
Regrading
Getting Good Grades


GUIDELINES ON AVOIDING ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

We will discuss in class the nature of academic misconduct, including plagiarism. You are responsible for understanding the different varieties of academic misconduct. If I encounter solid evidence of academic misconduct I will discuss the matter with you, and then deliver the consequence I deem appropriate. Possible consequences include: failure on the assignment in question (i.e., a 0); assigning a failing grade for the course; or attempting to have you expelled from Temple University. Should you wish to contest a decision I make on academic misconduct, I will inform you of the procedures to follow. The department and the college have fully specified grievance procedures.


 Makeup Policy.

There will be no makeups for missed quizzes or exams unless
* you notify me before the missed event
* and you have a reason formissing the quiz or exam that I find valid (e.g., car accident) (I no longer accept excuses like your friend's grandmother dying.)
* and I have something in writing, for my records, verifying the nature of the problem.


 Late Assignments.

     Assignments are due on the date indicated. I reserve the right to lower the grade for assignments that are handed in late. The amount the grade is lowered increases the longer the delay in handing the assignment in. Depending on the assignment, the grade may be lowered 1% to 10% a day.
     If you have an excuse for a late assignment I will take this in to account only if you notify me beforehand about the problem and I find your excuse for the delay to be a valid one and I have something in writing. Again, a friend's grandfather's death may be questionable.


 Regrading policy.

     You have the right to submit any assignment for regrading. If you wish to submit an assignment for regrading proceed as follows:
      Prepare a written statement explaining why the assignment should be regraded. This applies to written assignments, essay exams, and multiple choice exam questions where you think there was more than one correct answer.
      On a cover sheet print your name, SSN, name of the assignment or test, date of the assignment or test, and the date you submitted the assignment for regrading.
      Staple the cover sheet to your written rationale and the original assignment.
     I will review your request for regrading. I will consult with other faculty if I deem that appropriate. As a result of your request for regrading the grade on your original assignment may stay the same, or it may go up, or it may go down.


Guidelines for Getting Good Grades on Papers

     The number of written assignments for your class has not been set yet. It is probably the case that the different assignments will be different. Paper 2 will ask you to do something different than Paper 1.
     You will receive detailed instructions for each at least two weeks before the due date. I encourage you to discuss with me any questions you might have about the assignment well in advance of the due date.
     You should type each written assignment, double spaced. You also should proof your written work carefully. Mis-spelled words and flagrantly poor grammar will reduce your grade. On your papers I usually take off one point for every mis-spelled word and one point for every flagrant grammatical error. Needless to say, this can add up after a while. I urge you to:

* always run the spell checker
* always run a grammar checker
* proofread carefully, if possible, get someone else to proofread for you as well.

     Many students find that their writing improves if they consult some books on writing like Strunk & White's The Elements of Style or Provost's 100 Ways to Improve Your Writing.

I strongly urge you to carefully proofread and to spell check and to grammar check every paper.

     Note that all written assignments count; none are dropped. Please note that ALL written assignments must be completed in order to receive a grade in the course.
     Past experience suggests that students who prepare an initial draft and then revise it, and who run grammar and spelling checkers, generally get better grades.